Supervising Winners

To lead winners during violent encounters, throughout the police job and even in life, you must study leadership, read and research, develop your personal skills as well as your inter-personal skills, you must demand the best from your officers and...


  • The Coach--The coach stands back and offers advice or criticism with the end goal of improved performance. If everyone operates in a tactically sound manner, then everyone is safer and the coach is interested in everyone winning.
  • The Leader--You'll always know where to look for the leader...he or she will be at the front. The leader sets the example in work ethic and in safety compliance.
  • The Mentor--The supervisor everyone want to be when they grow up, this type of supervisor serves as an example for the way to operate as an officer and how to supervise once promoted.
  • The Trainer--Always looking for a better and safer way, the trainer insists that lessons can be learned from the outcome of every situation good and bad. Every supervisor is a trainer or should be.
  • The Dutch Uncle--There is a way to chew subordinate's ass, put your arm around them, walk them away from everyone and in a calm voice ask, "What the hell were you thinking?" And then, "How can we improve this performance?"
demand a higher work standard in quantity, quality and safety

These types of supervisors are indeed leaders, loved and admired by the troops for all the right reasons. In order to lead, you must know yourself and know your troops. Without knowing who you are and without self-confidence and positive self-image, how can you lead others?

Make no mistake--the leaders of men are oftentimes not encouraged by administrations. Many times because of their focus on taking care of the troops, they'll get a "loose cannon," "not a team player," or "maverick" reputation. So be it, the leader sleeps peacefully in his or her bed at night because of the nobleness of their mission--to take care of his men.

To lead winners during violent encounters, throughout the police job and even in life, you must study leadership, read and research, develop your personal skills as well as your inter-personal skills, you must demand the best from your officers and from yourself, you must delegate, and then trust your people to do the task well. Ultimately the troops must know that the reason you do everything and hold them to such a high standard is because you care about them. Then when they are standing victorious after having faced down death or serious injury, you clap them on the back and say, "Well done!" Because you genuinely care about them, and they know it, and you are indeed their leader--that will be worth more than any commendation.

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