ExtendAir r4900 Series Microwave Backhaul Systems

Exalt has expanded its ExtendAir product line with the ExtendAir r4900 Series, a new line of all-outdoor microwave backhaul systems for the licensed 4.9 GHz public safety frequency. ExtendAir r4900 Series radio systems are compact, rugged, all-outdoor units operating in the licensed 4.9 GHz band providing mission-critical reliability over distances of up to 30 miles. These systems incorporate FIPS 197-compliant 128- and 256-bit AES encryption for ironclad traffic security with secure SNMP v3 management. The ExtendAir r4900 Series systems also offer throughput symmetry control that allows public safety agencies to dedicate up to 80 percent of total aggregate traffic in either the upstream or downstream direction to better support highly asymmetrical applications such as video surveillance or remote dispatch including P25 backhaul. Moreover, like all Exalt microwave backhaul systems, ExtendAir r4900 Series systems support native T1/E1 traffic as needed, and they can optionally be configured with three 10/100BaseT ports to further reduce costs by eliminating the need for a separate Ethernet switch.
All Exalt microwave backhaul systems offer guaranteed link availability, guaranteed throughput and low, constant latency. Systems are available in world bands from 2 to 40 GHz and in capacities from 10 Mbps to more than 700 Mbps per channel, providing a range of options to fit countless network applications. Designed to enable a smooth transition to IP, they offer native support for both TDM and Ethernet, and are fully software configurable and upgradeable. For easy and secure management using third-party network management systems, Exalt systems support SNMP v1, v2c and v3. Data security is provided by available FIPS 197-compliant AES 128-bit and 256-bit encryption that adds zero latency to the transmission. To simplify installation and maintenance, all Exalt systems feature an embedded manual and most include a built-in spectrum analyzer.

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